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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

4 edition of Political budget cycles in new versus established democracies found in the catalog.

Political budget cycles in new versus established democracies

Adi Brender

Political budget cycles in new versus established democracies

by Adi Brender

  • 194 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Budgets -- Case studies.,
  • Business cycles -- Case studies.,
  • Democracy -- Case studies.,
  • New democracies -- Case studies.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementAdi Brender, Allan Drazen.
    GenreCase studies.
    SeriesNBER working paper series ;, working paper 10539, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online) ;, working paper no. 10539.
    ContributionsDrazen, Allan., National Bureau of Economic Research.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHB1
    The Physical Object
    FormatElectronic resource
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3476726M
    LC Control Number2005616258

    Political Budget Cycles in New Versus Established Democracies Abstract Like other recent studies, we find a political deficit cycle in a large cross-section of countries, but show that this result is driven by the experience of "new democracies". We find that this result is driven by the experience of ‘new democracies’, where fiscal manipulation may be effective because of lack of experience with electoral politics or lack of information that voters in more established democracies use. The strong budget cycle in those countries accounts for the finding of a budget cycle in larger.

    Literature Review. Since the concept of political business cycles (PBC) was first proposed by Nordhaus (), the literature on the political economy of fiscal policy has mainly focused on the political and institutional factors behind budget a few papers have dealt with the political economy of public investment and capital accumulation. 2 The literature can be grouped into. Philosopher Plato discusses five types of regimes (Republic, Book VIII; Greek: πέντε πολιτεῖαι).They are Aristocracy, Timocracy, Oligarchy, Democracy, and also assigns a man to each of these regimes to illustrate what they stand for. The tyrannical man would represent Tyranny, for example.

    Illusion literature and the consequences of Fiscal Illusion on Political Budget Cycles and its predictions. Section 3 discusses the construction of a Fiscal Illusion Index available to a large range of democracies (the 68 democracies particularly studied by Brender and Drazen (), since to ). established democracies use. The strong budget cycle in those countries accounts for the finding of a budget cycle in larger samples that include these countries. Once these countries are removed from the larger sample, the political budget cycle disappears. Our findings may reconcile two contradictory views of pre-electoral manipulation, one.


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Political budget cycles in new versus established democracies by Adi Brender Download PDF EPUB FB2

But, in terms of aggregate fiscal expansion, it is the new democracies where the political budget cycle is really occurring. Country, government, and electoral characteristics.

Many empirical studies of the political budget cycle across countries argue that the strength of cycle depends on a country's economic or political by: Like other recent studies, we find a political deficit cycle in a large cross-section of countries, but show that this result is driven by the experience of “new democracies”.

The political budget cycle in new democracies accounts for the finding of a budget cycle in larger samples that include these countries and disappears when they are Cited by: Political Budget Cycles in New versus Established Democracies Adi Brender, Allan Drazen.

NBER Working Paper No. Issued in June NBER Program(s):Economic Fluctuations and Growth, International Finance and Macroeconomics Like other recent studies, we find the existence of a political deficit cycle in a large cross-section of by: Like other recent studies, we find a political deficit cycle in a large cross-section of countries, but show that this result is driven by the experience of “new democracies”.

The political budget cycle in new democracies accounts for the finding of. The strong budget cycle in those countries accounts for the finding of a budget cycle in larger samples that include these countries; when these countries are removed from the larger sample, so that only established' democracies remain, the political budget cycle disappears.

The political deficit cycle in new democracies accounts for findings. Political Budget Cycles in New Versus Established Democracies Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Monetary Economics 52(7) February with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Political Budget Cycles in New versus Established Democracies. Political Budget Cycles in New versus Established Democracies. Adi Brender and Allan Drazen (). NoNBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc Abstract: Like other recent studies, we find the existence of a political deficit cycle in a large cross-section of countries.

However, we find that this result is driven by the experience of new democracies'. Political Budget Cycles in New versus Established Democracies: Adi Brender and Allan Drazen: Abstract: Like other recent studies, we find a political deficit cycle in a large cross-section of countries, but show that this result is driven by the experience of "new democracies".

Downloadable. We study how distributive politics affects political budget cycles and voting within a federal country. Our model predicts not only that the president favors politically aligned governors with larger transfers, but also that voters favor gubernatorial candidates aligned with the expected presidential incumbent because larger transfers are expected in the future.

Political Budget Cycles in New versus Established Democracies - Adi Brender and Allan Drazen - Presented by Virginia Degara and Enrico Di Gregorio IGIER, 21 st March - Adi Brender and Allan Drazen - Political Budget Cycles in New versus Established Democracies 1 / The strong budget cycle in those countries accounts for the finding of a budget cycle in larger samples that include these countries; when these countries are removed from the larger sample, so that only established' democracies remain, the political budget cycle disappears.

The political deficit cycle in new democracies accounts for findings Author: Adi Brender and Allan Drazen. The strong budget cycle in those countries accounts for the finding of a budget cycle in larger samples that include these countries; when these countries are removed from the larger sample, so that only “established” democracies remain, the political budget cycle disappears.

The political deficit cycle in new democracies accounts for. Abstract. Theoretical and empirical research on political budget cycles is surveyed and discussed.

Significant political budget cycles are seen to be primarily a phenomenon of the first elections after the transition to a democratic electoral system. Political Budget Cycles in New Versus Established Democracies Journal of Monetary Economics, Vol.

52, No. 5, pp.Number of pages: 25 Posted: 21 Jul We test for political budget cycles in a panel of eighteen Latin American democracies from to Recent studies have argued that the pattern of deficit cycles in a large cross-section of. Political budget cycles in new versus established democracies. Cambridge, Mass.: National Bureau of Economic Research, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Adi Brender; Allan Drazen; National Bureau of Economic Research.

non-OECD democracies, then it might be easier to detect political budget cycles at least in some de-veloping countries or new democracies.

This paper may, therefore, help explain why political budget cycles are rarely found in established OECD democracies, but often in developing countries and new democracies.

Get this from a library. Political budget cycles in new versus established democracies. [Adi Brender; Allan Drazen; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- "Like other recent studies, we find the existence of a political deficit cycle in a large cross-section of countries.

However, we find that this result is driven by the experience of new. P political budget cycles Theoretical and empirical research on political budget cycles is surveyed and discussed. Significant political budget cycles are seen to be primarily a phe-nomenon of the first elections after the transition to a democratic electoral system.

Political budget cycles are cycles in some component of the government. Political Budget Cycles Revisited: The Case for Social Capital Omiros Kouvavasy University of Warwick June 6, based on seemingly institutional features of countries such as New versus Established democracies (Brender and Drazen,) and Developing versus .This article studies the contextual determinants of incumbents' ability and incentives to engineer political business cycles in American states.

It presents a short review of related literature to clarify how and why the theory of political budget cycles evolved. It describes the data and methodology — single estimation method of dynamic panel analysis — used in the study.The political budget cycle, that is, the increase in government deficits or expenditures in election years relative to non-election years, is a widely-studied phenomenon.

Conventional wisdom is that political budget cycles are a common phenomenon in many countries, especially developing ones (see forexample, ShiandSvensson[]).